A unique new major combines the study of religion, politics, and law to help prepare students for law school. According to Kirk MacGregor, assistant professor of philosophy and religion, data indicates that students of philosophy and religion consistently score high on the LSAT (Law School Admissions Test) and possess high rates of admission to law school. The new Religion, Politics, and Law major explores provocative hot-button issues at the heart of current religious, political, and legal discourse in the United States.

The major teaches skills in logical reasoning, analysis and synthesis of texts, inference to the best explanation from a set of data, persuasive public speaking, and constructive writing – all skills at the core of what lawyers do. Along with these skills, students will also carry out individual research on a legal issue of particular interest and applicable to their future career aspirations in law.

The major comprises 48-49 hours of required courses in philosophy and religion including ethics, critical thinking, science and religion, religion and politics, among others. Supporting classes may also include U.S. government, political history, business law, and conflict communication, among others.